Kinect Guide Resources

Mac OS X

Ning Ma's FLying Squares with dynamically controlled background perspective and change colours.

There aren't very many instructional guides or videos out there that go into detail when describing how to take a kinect captured image, import it into blender and then map a texture to it. Trust me, I spent a lot of time looking around. That goes double for Mac users.

The other day I posted an article about a great little game developed by Paul & Syd.

Here a quick -- and when I say quick, I mean quick -- guide to get you up and running with libfreenect drivers on a Mac OS X.

UPDATE: OpenNI has a new site so a lot of the links (and some instruction on how to obtain things) have changed.

Ryan Challinor wrote an incredibly useful tool for speeding up the set up process involved with using your Kinect sensor with Apple's free visual programming tool Quartz Composer.

Linux

I came across this easy to set up mouse control Kinect hack for Ubuntu. From what I can tell, you can't execute any "click" commands so it isn't the most practical hack out there. It may however prove to be a good jumping off point if you were interested in developing a Minority Report type interface for Ubuntu.

If you've been following the Kinect hacking and development scene for as long as I have, there's a good chance you'll rememeber the Keyboard Anywhere hack. It was one of the first real eye openning Kinect hacks to hit the scene and for good reason.

libfreenect is the end result of the famous Adafruit Kinect hacking bounty X-Prize winner. After it made its mark on the scene, the OpenKinect community was born and the rest is history. This guide will provide the resources necessary to install the OpenKinect libfreenect drivers for Ubuntu. The original installation guide can be found at OpenKinect's Getting Started Guide.

Windows

UPDATE: Forget about all that, the ZigFu package installer is flawless and by far the easiest way to get your Kinect working with your computer and it takes all of two minutes.